Preparing for a future Nuclear war? India vs Pakistan


indian Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor

indian Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor

NEW DELHI: Army chief Gen Deepak Kapoor may have opened a fresh discussion on India’s nuclear posture and preparedness with his recent remarks that if reports of Pakistan’s expanded arsenal are correct, then New Delhi may well have to reconsider its strategic stance.
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Pakistan shifting from Uranium to Plutonium for its Nukes: Report

sdIn a paper written for the Bulletin for Atomic Scientists, Robert Norris of the Natural Resources Defense Council and Hans Kristensen of the Federation of American Scientists say Pakistan’s weapons and deliver-systems can be assumed to be India-specific because Islamabad “has not declared any other adversary.” The United States has been expressing concern to Pakistan about its accelerated program and urging it hold back, but there does not appear to be any concerted effort from Washington to influence Pakistan’s decisions, it said.
In their paper, Kristensen and Norris say Pakistan is improving its weapon designs, moving beyond its first-generation nuclear weapons that relied on Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). After pursuing plutonium-based designs for more than a decade, Islamabad appears to have mastered the technology.
Central to that effort, the paper says, is the 40–50-megawatt heavy water Khushab plutonium production reactor, which was completed in 1998 and is located at Joharabad in the Khushab district of Punjab. Six surface-to-air missile batteries surround the site to protect against air strikes. Norris and Kristensen say as a sign of its confidence in its plutonium designs, Pakistan is building two additional heavy water reactors at the Khushab site, which will more than triple the country’s plutonium production.
Explaining the changing nature of the Pak arsenal, they say all of these efforts suggest that Pakistan is preparing to increase and enhance its nuclear forces. In particular, the new facilities provide the Pakistani military with several options: fabricating weapons that use plutonium cores; mixing plutonium with HEU to make composite cores; and/or using tritium to “boost” warheads’ yield.
Without referencing the recent controversy in India about the success or otherwise of its thermo-nuclear test in 1998 (now dubbed the sizzle vs fizzle debate), the paper says “absent a successful full-scale thermonuclear test (by Pakistan), it is premature to suggest that Pakistan is producing two-stage thermonuclear weapons” – in other words, it has yet to acquire a Hydrogen Bomb.
But, they say, the types of facilities under construction suggest that Pakistan has decided to supplement and perhaps replace its heavy uranium-based weapons with smaller, lighter plutonium-based designs that could be delivered further by ballistic missiles than its current warheads and that could be used in cruise missiles.

atomic explosion - 4In a paper written for the Bulletin for Atomic Scientists, Robert Norris of the Natural Resources Defense Council and Hans Kristensen of the Federation of American Scientists say Pakistan’s weapons and deliver-systems can be assumed to be India-specific because Islamabad “has not declared any other adversary.” The United States has been expressing concern to Pakistan about its accelerated program and urging it hold back, but there does not appear to be any concerted effort from Washington to influence Pakistan’s decisions, they said.

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Indian Nuclear Test WASN’T fully successful: Indian Scientist

Indian Nuclear Test WASN’T fully successful

Indian Nuclear Test WASN’T fully successful

NEW DELHI: The 1998 Pokhran II nuclear tests might have been far from the success they have been claimed to be. The yield of the thermonuclear explosions was actually much below expectations and the tests were perhaps more a fizzle rather than a big bang.

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Iran awaiting Ayatollah’s order to build Nuclear Bomb

Iran awaiting Ayatollah's order to build Nuclear Bomb

Iran awaiting Ayatollah's order to build Nuclear Bomb

The sources said that Iran completed a research programme to create weaponised uranium in the summer of 2003 and that it could feasibly make a bomb within a year of an order from its Supreme Leader.

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Myanmar building nuke reactor, says media

atomic explosion - 4

NEW DELHI: After Iran and North Korea, the next international pariah to be accused of having nuclear ambitions is Myanmar. Continue reading

Iran waiting for Khamenei’s order to build N-bomb: Report

nuclear_bomb_mushroom_cloudLONDON: Iran is awaiting orders from its supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, to produce its first nuclear bomb, western intelligence sources have said.

According to sources, Iran completed its research program to create weaponised uranium in the summer of 2003, and now claims that once it receives orders from Khamenei, it could feasibly make a bomb within a year of it. Continue reading